• 'Nduja Di Spilinga

    Posted by G. Pasticcini

    What is 'nduja di Spilinga?



    Fast becoming the latest delicacy across the UK, 'nduja is an aromatic spicy salami which is spreadable and comes in a jar. The simplest way to eat it is also the best; spread across a crusty slice of bread or with a ripe and fragrant cheese. It can also be used to top pizza or as a fiery base for a pasta sauce.

    'Nduja uses the shoulder and belly of the pork along with a mixture of herbs and spices to give it a unique salami- style flavour. It originates from the small town of Spilinga in the Calabria region.

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  • Finding your way round coffee in Italy

    Posted by Giuseppe Iampietro


    If a ‘triple, venti, no foam latte’ is your drink of choice in the UK, you’re going to need a rethink for Italy.
    Latte, Frappuccino and mocha will be met with funny looks as these drinks are not Italian at all, they are introduced by the international chains looking to meet our caffeine needs.
    In Italy, the coffee is simple, what is known here as ‘espresso’ is what you will receive if you order a coffee or ‘un caffè ’. This will come with a glass of water, which is to be enjoyed before the coffee as a palette cleanser. Locals will generally drink an espresso at the bar whilst standing and the price will be around 1euro. If you are seated the price may increase a little. The coffee will be short, dark and strong and you can add sugar to your preference. If you would like a little hot milk added this becomes a ‘macchiato’.
    Or for a larger better known coffee, you may like a cappuccino, this is an espresso with steamed frothy milk added to the top, however you may receive an odd look ordering after around 11am, as Italians consider this a 'breakfast' rather than a coffee due to the heaviness of the milk, and would almost certainly never be consumed after a meal! Similar to this is the caffè latte, espresso with hot milk, normally served in a glass, no foam, but be aware; don’t ask for just a 'latte' unless all you want is a glass of cold milk! For those who enjoy a tipple in their coffee, you’ll also find a 'caffè corretto' which is a shot of espresso with a drop of liquor usually grappa or Sambuca.  
    Whichever you go for, just know that you’ll soon be hooked. 

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  • Mothers Day

    Posted by Giuseppe Iampietro



    Mother’s Day Gift Ideas

     £5 and under
    This could be a great opportunity to try something a little different with our Squid Ink extra-long spaghetti £4.25 or If your mamma is a real ‘foodie’ she’ll love our Fig Chutney in Balsamic Vinegar which is the perfect accompaniment to aged cheeses £4.25

    https://pasticcini-uk.co.uk/collections/store-cupboard/products/fig-chutney-in-balsamic-vinegar-100g£5 - £10
    Our chocolate truffles could be the perfect treat for your mum with a choice between darker richer chocolate and a creamier milk chocolate £9.95

    £10 – £20
    Whilst your siblings are buying perfume or flowers, you could offer the perfect scented gift with our white truffle oil, which with just one drop, will add luxury to any meal £13.95 or an extra-special treat with our Coffee Lovers Gift Set for £17.50 https://pasticcini-uk.co.uk/collections/oils-vinegar/products/sabatino-co-premium-white-truffle-flavoured-olive-oil-100m

    £20+
    For the more lavish, how about these indulgent hampers; Coffee and Chocolate Hamper £22.50 or our Luxury Italian Hamper for £49.50


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  • Witches kisses

    Posted by Giuseppe Iampietro

    Every product has its story but one of our favourites is that of our speciality chocolates from Liguria. They’re made in a tiny village in the mountains which is known for witch trials in the sixteenth century. The area was gripped by poverty and famine, and with the Spanish inquisition still present in nearby Genoa, the locals decided to blame witchcraft for the famine oppressing so many. Four girls and a boy were blamed for causing the famine through witchcraft and a series of trials followed.

    The gruesome history is now part of the areas rich heritage which is celebrated in August during a witchcraft festival and, of course, Hallowe’en.The chocolates, named ‘witches kisses’ play to this tale and the hand-made rich milk chocolate and nut truffles must have a degree of magic to give such a spellbinding flavour.

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  • So what makes Italian food so good?

    Posted by Giuseppe Iampietro

    Italian food rarely contains more than a handful of ingredients and requires no fancy twists. But one taste of any Italian meal and we all agree it works.
    It’s about simplicity; using few ingredients but using the best you can source. It takes time and care rather than expert techniques and decoration.

    There’s a mindset in Italy to use every bit of any ingredient. For example our sun dried tomatoes from Liguria are delicious and can be used in all sorts of meals from pasta to bruschetta, salad to antipasti, but what about the oil it sits in? This is now tomato-infused oil. When the tomatoes are gone, the oil still provides a great base for a light pasta or salad dressing. Nothing goes to waste and two or three dishes can come from the simplest ingredient.

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